The Ultimate Guide to Preparing Snacks the Indian Way by Prasenjeet Kumar, Sonali Kumar

Savour 91 Exotic, Mouth-Watering Snacks Prepared the Way Only Indians Can ….

The ultimate guide to preparing snacks the indian way

Savour 91 Exotic, Mouth-Watering Snacks Prepared the Way Only Indians Can ….

In India, visit someone’s home in the North, and you are bound to be offered, with your tea, some Indian snacks like Pakoras (vegetable fritters) or Chiura (savoury rice flakes).

In wayside eateries, you may see some Aloo (potato) or Paneer (cottage cheese) Tikkis (cutlets) being sizzled on huge pans, or Samosas being fried in woks.

On festivals and weddings, you are quite likely to encounter the melt-in-the-mouth Dahi Baras/Bhallas.

In Gujarat, you will have steamed Dhokhlas and rolled Khandvis.

 In South India, you can’t escape some kind of Idli, Dosa, or Vada.

And then there are the Indian accompaniments like chutneys (sauces) and raitas (yoghurt-based dish), without which not just snacks but an Indian thali (platter) would be considered incomplete.

In that background, Prasenjeet Kumar and Sonali Kumar, the #1 best-selling authors of "Cooking In A Jiffy" series of cookbooks present 91 idiot proof recipes for preparing: 12 North-Indian snacks, 7 South-Indian, 10 East-Indian, 6 West-Indian, 5 snacks-on-the-go, 7 types of kebabs, 11 kinds using fish, 7 chicken snacks, 9 chutneys, 6 kinds of raitas, and 11 drinks.

Genre: COOKING / Regional & Ethnic / Indian & South Asian

Secondary Genre: COOKING / Courses & Dishes / Sauces & Dressings

Language: English

Keywords: indian cooking, indian recipes, indian food, curry recipes, quick and easy indian cooking, classic indian cooking, indian home cooking, samosa recipes, chutney recipes, kebab recipes, Gujarati recipes, South Indian dishes

Word Count: 30,000 words approx.

Sales info:

This is the latest book from two Amazon best-selling authors.


Sample text:

In India, snacks are neither entrées nor sides nor side dishes.

So, in India just steamed rice or boiled corn won’t be served as sides, although rice or rotis would occupy quite a pride of place on the main Indian meal platter.

But visit someone’s home in North India, and you are bound to be offered, with your tea, some Indian snacks like Pakoras (vegetable fritters) or Chiura/Poha (savoury rice flakes). In wayside eateries, you may also see some Aloo (potato) or Paneer (cottage cheese) Tikkis (cutlets) being sizzled on huge pans, or Samosas being fried in woks. On festivals and weddings, you are quite likely to encounter the melt-in-the-mouth Dahi Baras/ Bhallas. On travels, Indians like to carry some Nimkis or Mathis which last for as long as a fortnight if stored in an airtight jar.

In Mumbai, you will be plied with Vada-Pav, the famous street food. In Gujarat, you will have steamed Dhokhlas and rolled Khandvis. In South Indian states like Tamil Nadu, Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka and Kerala, you can’t escape some kind of Idli, Dosa, or Vada. And for the taste of the Raj, you will have to go to Kolkata to have a taste of British-style cutlets and chops.

And then there are the Indian accompaniments like chutneys (sauces) and raitas (yoghurt-based dish), without which not just snacks but an Indian thali (platter) would be considered incomplete. You basically take a bite of these to wake up your taste buds and to cleanse your palate, so to say.


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