Preparing for My First Cockatiel by Laurel A. Rockefeller

Introduce your child to the wonderful world of cockatiels

Preparing for my first cockatiel

Preparing for My First Cockatiel is a guide book for you and your children to help you know what it takes to get ready for bringing home your very first cockatiel. 

Unlike most books about cockatiels out there, this one doesn't try to cover everything, but stays focused on what you need to be ready for your new life with your bird. 

Full of personal stories and photos, you will get to know what life with cockatiels is like from my many years living with and loving them. A fun book for anyone who loves animals! 

Topics covered include: 
-- Cockatiels as cockatoos 
-- Primary cages 
-- Travel/hospital cages (including cages for domestic & international air travel) 
-- Play spaces 
-- Food 
-- Toys 
-- Perches 
-- Food dishes 
-- Communicating with a new or shy cockatiel 
-- Preventing psittacosis (the main disease that transmits between humans and birds) 
-- Games to play with your new bird 

Genre: PETS / Birds

Secondary Genre: FAMILY & RELATIONSHIPS / Activities

Language: English

Keywords: cockatoo, parrot, children's books, guide, animals, pet birds, parrot behavior

Word Count: 11000

Sales info:

After Boudicca:  Britain's Queen of the Iceni this is my best seller, especially in paperback.  Focused on children and families, this book filled with full colour photographs provides new and potential cockatiel owners with a wealth of practical information so people can make an informed decision about birds.


Sample text:

Scientific Names

Scientifically, cockatiels are called Nymphicus hollandicus. That is Latin for “the goddess of New Holland.”  Just as many regions of the United States were originally settled as Dutch colonies, Australia’s first European settlers were also Dutch.  From 1644-1824 Australia was properly known as “New Holland.”  Nymphicus hollandicus therefore reminds us that cockatiels are a distinctly Australian cockatoo – unlike other cockatoo species like umbrella (Cacatua alba), Moluccan (aka Seram cockatoo, Cacatua moluccensis), and Abbott’s cockatoo (Cacatua sulphurea abbotti ) which are all from Indonesia.

 

Linnaean taxonomy considers cockatiels:

Kingdom:  Animalia (animal)

Phylum: Chordata (vertebrates)

Class:  Aves (birds)

Order:  Psittaciformes (parrots)

Family: Cacatuidae (cockatoos)

Genus: Nymphicus

Species: N. hollandicus

 

That is to say cockatiels belong to the cockatoo family of parrots.  Parrots are birds.  Birds have spines and are animals.

While it does not seem like any of that matters, knowing where cockatiels fit in nature actually helps you understand a great deal about them, especially if you have other animals in your home.  It shows you the relationship between animals – what is similar, what is different—which in turn helps you make good decisions about caring for each animal in your home.

A bird is not a mammal. A parrot is not a finch.  A cockatoo is not a parakeet (another parrot family).  A cockatiel is similar to but not exactly like any other cockatoo species.  Knowing how to take care of a dog, a rabbit, a hamster, or a turtle will not help you take care of your cockatiel. 


Book translation status:

The book is available for translation into any language except those listed below:

LanguageStatus
French
Already translated. Translated by Christelle Savary
Author review:
Christelle's French is very accurate and she provides a quality translation. However, she did not always adhere to the formatting in my book and did not communicate with me frequently enough to properly deal with the quirks of my book, adding work for me in creation of the paperback especially.
Greek
Translation in progress. Translated by Evangelia Bougla
Italian
Already translated. Translated by Felicia Salomone
Author review:
Ms. Salomone was very detailed oriented in her translation. She was also an exceptional communicator, making sure of the technical requirements as she worked so she could deliver the best quality work as the client wanted. would definitely recommend.
Spanish
Already translated. Translated by Matilde Durón
Author review:
Excellent technical translation. However, this translator needs to improve on her communication skills. There were a number of small but important mistakes in the final work that could have easily been avoided by communicating with me before submitting the book as complete.

Would you like to translate this book? Make an offer to the Rights Holder!



  Return