The aging gap between species by Anca Ioviţă

Aging is a puzzle to solve. Lifespans among species vary wildly. Why is that? Find out today.

The aging gap between species

Aging is a puzzle to solve.
This process is traditionally studied in a couple of biological models like fruit flies, worms and mice. What all these species have in common is their fast aging. This is excellent for lab budgets. It is a great short-term strategy. Who has time to study species that live for decades?

But lifespan differences among species are orders of magnitude larger than any lifespan variation achieved in the lab. This is the reason for which I studied countless information resources in an attempt to gather highly specialized research into one easy-to-follow book. I wanted to see the forest among the trees. I wanted to expose the aging gap between species in an easy-to-follow and logical sequence. This book is my attempt at doing just that.

What are the mechanisms underlying the aging gap between species? I intentionally chose to write the answer to this question in plain English. Aging research is too important to hide it behind the closed doors of formal scientific jargon. This book could not have existed if green tea, libraries and the Internet were not invented. The amount of data I had to browse in order to keep the essential patterns is huge. Yet this book is not exhaustive. This is not a dry academic textbook. I tried to instill life in a topic that is hugely important for the extension of human lifespan. Only you can decide if I achieved this.

Genre: NATURE / General

Secondary Genre: SCIENCE / Life Sciences / Biology

Language: English

Keywords: aging, comparative gerontology, popular science, nature, biology, developmental biology, rejuvenation, senescence

Word Count: 35,560

Sales info:

The English version has an average of 4.7 stars from 6 reviews on Amazon and 4.75 stars from 4 reviews on Goodreads.

This book counts among Top 100 on Amazon Developmental Biology category.


Sample text:

Aging is a puzzle to solve.
This process is traditionally studied in a couple of biological models like fruit flies, worms and mice. What all these species have in common is their fast aging. This is excellent for lab budgets. It is a great short-term strategy. Who has time to study species that live for decades?

But lifespan differences among species are orders of magnitude larger than any lifespan variation achieved in the lab. This is the reason for which I studied countless information resources in an attempt to gather highly specialized research into one easy-to-follow book. I wanted to see the forest among the trees. I wanted to expose the aging gap between species in an easy-to-follow and logical sequence. This book is my attempt at doing just that.

What are the mechanisms underlying the aging gap between species? I intentionally chose to write the answer to this question in plain English. Aging research is too important to hide it behind the closed doors of formal scientific jargon. This book could not have existed if green tea, libraries and the Internet were not invented. The amount of data I had to browse in order to keep the essential patterns is huge. Yet this book is not exhaustive. This is not a dry academic textbook. I tried to instill life in a topic that is hugely important for the extension of human lifespan. Only you can decide if I achieved this.


Book translation status:

The book is available for translation into any language except those listed below:

LanguageStatus
Dutch
Already translated. Translated by Vincent Oostelbos
Author review:
My collaboration with Vincent Oostelbos for the Dutch translation of "The Aging Gap Between Species" has been excellent as he provided an excellent translation despite the niche jargon terminology of the book. The ease of communication with him has also been appreciated throughout the project.
French
Already translated. Translated by Marion Moorghen and Caroline Ballet
Author review:
Although the topic was unusual and intricate and full of niche words, Marion and Caroline did a great job in translating 'The aging gap between species' into French. Communication was always timely and to the point. Highly recommended!
German
Unavailable for translation.
Portuguese
Already translated. Translated by Rosana Felício dos Santos and Rosângela Felício dos Santos
Author review:
Although the topic was unusual and intricate and full of niche words, Rosana and Rosangela did a great job in translating 'The aging gap between species' into Portuguese. Communication was always timely and to the point. I can't recommend them enough!
Spanish
Already translated. Translated by David Arieta Galván and Marcela Gutiérrez Bravo
Author review:
This is the second time I work with this translator-editor team and I can't but recommend them again. Although the book was very niche and full of biological science terms, they both delivered a great book in Spanish!

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